Fast-Tracking of Illinois Pension Case Could Be Blocked

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Last week, Illinois asked the state Supreme Court to expedite the hearing over the state’s pension reform law.

But on Sunday, attorneys representing the state workers and retirees said they could block the attempt to fast track the case. Such a move could drastically change the timeline for the lawsuit’s hearing.

From the Southern Illinoisan:

In a move that could play a significant role in how Gov.-elect Bruce Rauner crafts his first budget this spring, the lawyers say Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan’s bid to put the case on a fast track is unwarranted.

“We do not believe there is any need to impose an emergency schedule,” said attorney John Fitzgerald, who is among a team of lawyers representing retirees. “We see no need to depart from the rules.”

On Thursday, Madigan asked the high court to move quickly in hearing the case because of the financial ramifications the pension changes will have on the state budget.

[…]

Madigan suggested the court schedule oral arguments for as early as Jan. 22 or no later than mid-March.

Attorneys for the retirees, who say the expedited schedule is unnecessary, have until Tuesday to file their objections to the motion.

Without the expedited schedule, the deadline for filing the first significant set of records in the case wouldn’t occur until the final week of January.

After that, the typical court schedule calls for both sides in the lawsuit to trade paperwork for nearly three months. Once that is completed, the high court would then schedule oral arguments.

Under that scenario, the court could hear the case as early as May. If they miss the May docket, the next time the judges are scheduled to hear oral arguments is September.

Following the argument phase, the court could take months to issue a ruling. In a similar case regarding health insurance costs, the court took nearly 10 months to overturn the state’s attempt to force retirees to pay a portion of their pensions toward that expense.

Sangamon County Circuit Judge John Belz ruled last month that the law was unconstitutional.

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